Policies

Respite Care Needed to Limit Burdens on Family Caregivers

Policies, Resources for Family Caregiver

While that vast majority of older Americans want to remain in their homes through retirement, aging in place often requires some help—and the first choice for a caregiver is often an adult child, according to research from the Center for Retirement Research at Boston College.

More than 50% of adults 85 and older will have at least one limitation related to instrumental activities of daily living (ADLs), requiring some form of help, the Center found. As more Americans head into the golden years, more care will be needed. (Home Health Care News, Baxter, 6/6). Read Full Article.


New Federal Rules Will Require Home Health Agencies To Do Much More For Patients

Policies, Referring to Home Health
Now, patients will be asked what they feel comfortable doing and what they want to achieve, and care plans will be devised by agencies with their individual circumstances in mind.

Now, patients will be asked what they feel comfortable doing and what they want to achieve, and care plans will be devised by agencies with their individual circumstances in mind.

Kaiser Health News: New Federal Rules Will Require Home Health Agencies To Do Much More For Patients 
Judith Graham writes: “Home health agencies will be required to become more responsive to patients and their caregivers under the first major overhaul of rules governing these organizations in almost 30 years. The federal regulations, published last month, specify the conditions under which 12,600 home health agencies can participate in Medicare and Medicaid, serving more than 5 million seniors and younger adults with disabilities through these government programs.” (Graham, 2/9)


Medicare Proposes Expansion of Counseling Program For People At Risk of Diabetes

Medicare Patient News, Policies

Kaiser Health News’ Mary Agnes Carey reports: “As the health law turned six Wednesday, federal officials proposed the expansion of a Medicare diabetes prevention program funded by the landmark measure.

The pilot program, developed and administered by the YMCA, helped Medicare enrollees at high risk of developing the disease improve their diets, increase their exercise and lose about 5 percent of their body weight. Beneficiaries in the program, funded by an $11.8 million grant provided by the health law, attended weekly meetings with a lifestyle coach to develop long-term changes to their diet, discussed ways to get more physical activity and made behavior changes that would help control their weight and decrease their risk of Type 2 diabetes. Participants could also attend monthly follow-up meetings to help keep their new habits in place.” (Carey, 3/23)

Read entire article here.