Reports & Statistics

What Medicare Beneficiaries Pay Out-Of-Pocket For Cancer

Medicare Patient News, Reports & Statistics

If you are a Medicare beneficiary with a new cancer diagnosis, you can expect to incur some steep out-of-pocket (OOP) costs, according to a study published recently by JAMA Oncology. And those costs vary depending on the type – if any – of supplemental insurance you have. Hospitalizations were a primary driver of these high OOP costs.

For instance, patients with only Medicare, and no additional health coverage, paid on average $8,115 a year (that’s 23.7 percent of their incomes) on out-of-pocket costs after a diagnosis of cancer.

Beneficiaries in private Medicare plans, which is part of Medicare Advantage, had costs of almost $6,000 a year.

The lowest out-of-pocket costs went to Medicare beneficiaries who also had coverage through Medicaid ($2,116 a year) or the Veterans Health Administration ($2,367 a year).

Seniors with additional coverage through employers had costs of almost $5,500, while those with private “Medigap” policies, which cover copays and deductibles not picked up by Medicare, had expenses of $5,670.

Among the 10 percent of beneficiaries with cancer who incurred the highest OOP costs, hospitalization contributed to 41.6 percent of total OOP costs.

Check out the study findings here.


A Record 60.6 Million Americans Live in Multigenerational Households

Elder Care Issues, Reports & Statistics
Twenty-one percent of adults age 65 and older live in a multigenerational household.

Twenty-one percent of adults age 65 and older live in a multigenerational household.

Pew Research Center: A Record 60.6 Million Americans Live in Multigenerational Households

The number and share of Americans living in multigenerational family households has continued to rise, even though the Great Recession is now in the rear-view mirror. In 2014, a record 60.6 million people, or 19% of the U.S. population, lived with multiple generations under one roof, according to a new Pew Research Center analysis of census data.

Multigenerational family living – defined as a household that includes two or more adult generations, or one that includes grandparents and grandchildren – is growing among nearly all U.S. racial groups as well as Hispanics, among all age groups and among both men and women.  The share of the population living in this type of household declined from 21% in 1950 to a low of 12% in 1980. Since then, multigenerational living has rebounded, increasing sharply during and immediately after the Great Recession of 2007-09. (D’Vera Cohn and Jeffrey S. Passel, 8/11)

Read full article.


New Online Medicare Tool Shows Disparity of Care for Chronic Disease

Reports & Statistics
New Medicare tool identifies disparities in health outcomes, utilization, and spending by race and ethnicity and geographic location.

New Medicare tool identifies disparities in health outcomes, utilization, and spending by race and ethnicity and geographic location.

The Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services Office of Minority Health (CMS OMH) released a new interactive map to increase understanding of geographic disparities in chronic disease among Medicare beneficiaries.

The Mapping Medicare Disparities (MMD) Tool identifies disparities in health outcomes, utilization, and spending by race and ethnicity and geographic location.  Understanding geographic differences in disparities is important to informing policy decisions and efficiently targeting populations and geographies for interventions.

“Our commitment to health equity begins with properly measuring the care people get and having an honest dialogue on how and where we need to improve,” said CMS Acting Administrator Andy Slavitt. “Today’s tool aims to make it harder for disparities to go unaddressed.”

Racial and ethnic minorities experience disproportionately high rates of chronic diseases, and are more likely to experience difficulty accessing high quality of care than other individuals. The identification of areas with large differences in the proportions of Medicare beneficiaries with chronic diseases is an important step for informing and planning health equity activities and initiatives. The Mapping Medicare Disparities Tool features:

A dynamic interface with data on the prevalence of 18 chronic conditions, end stage renal disease, or a disability; Medicare spending, hospital and emergency department (ED) utilization, preventable hospitalizations, readmissions, and mortality rates.

The ability to sort by state or county of residence, sex, age, dual-eligibility for Medicare and Medicaid, and race and ethnicity.

Built-in benchmarking features to investigate disparities within counties and across racial and ethnic groups, and within racial and ethnic groups across counties.

“It’s not enough to improve average health care quality in the U.S.,” said CMS OMH Director Cara James.  “As the CMS Equity Plan lays out, we must identify gaps in quality of care at all levels of the health care system to address disparities. We are excited to share this new tool, which allows us to pinpoint disparities in health care outcomes by population and condition.”

The MMD Tool was developed in collaboration with KPMG LLP and NORC at the University of Chicago as part of the CMS Equity Plan for Improving Quality in Medicare.  The plan provides a framework for advancing health equity by improving the quality of care provided to minority and other underserved Medicare beneficiaries.  MMD Tool

Access the MMD tool

MMD Tool Overview

MMD Tool Frequently Asked Questions (FAQ)

Quick Start Guide

MMD Tool Technical Documentation.

Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS) Office of Minority Health (OMH) was established as a result of the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (ACA) and  works to eliminate health disparities and improve the health of all minority populations, including racial and ethnic minorities, people with disabilities, members of the LGBT community, and rural populations.