Live Longer and Better By Doing This One Thing

Resources for Seniors

 

You are never too old to benefit from quitting smoking. Even if you quit at 60, you gain several years of life expectancy.

You are never too old to benefit from quitting smoking. Even if you quit at 60, you gain several years of life expectancy.

Quitting smoking is the single most important step a smoker can take to improve the length and quality of their life, according to the American Lung Association.

Some common reasons why you may want to stop:

For your health! According to the Surgeon General, quitting smoking is the single most important step a smoker can take to improve the length and quality of life. As soon as you quit, your body begins to repair the damage caused by smoking. Of course it’s best to quit early in life, but even people who quit later in life will improve their health.

To save money! It’s getting more expensive to smoke cigarettes. State and federal cigarette taxes continue to go up and in some places, a pack of cigarettes can cost $10.00. Even if a pack costs “only” $5.00 where you live, smoking one pack per day adds up to $1,825.00 each year.

To save the aggravation! It’s getting less convenient to smoke. More and more states and cities are passing clean indoor air laws that make it illegal to smoke in bars, restaurants, and other public places. Are you tired of having to go outside many times a day to have a cigarette? Is standing in the cold and the rain really worth having that cigarette? Wouldn’t it be easier if you had the choice to go outside only when you wanted to and not when you needed to?

It’s good for the people around you! Cigarette smoke is harmful to everyone who inhales it, not just the smoker. Whether you’re young or old and in good health or bad, secondhand smoke is dangerous and can make you sick. Children who live with smokers get more chest colds and ear infections, while babies born to mothers who smoke have an increased risk of premature delivery, low birth weight and sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS).

Resources to help you stop:

* For tools, tips, and support to help you quit smoking for good, go to Quitter in You.

* For an online support group to help you quit, go to QuitNet.

Benefits of stopping:

According to the World Health Organization people of all ages who have already developed smoking related health problems can still benefit from quitting:

At about age 30: gain almost ten years of life expectancy

At about age 40: gain nine years of life expectancy

At about age 50: gain six years of life expectancy

At about age 60: gain three years of life expectancy

After the onset of life-threatening disease: rapid benefit, people who quit smoking after having a heart attack reduce their chances of having another heart attack by 50 percent.