6 Ways You Can Prepare to Age Well

Aging in Place, Resources for Seniors
Think ahead about how you might get help in the event you needed services like meal preparation, transportation, or housecleaning.

Think ahead about how you might get help in the event you needed services like meal preparation, transportation, or housecleaning.

Seniors have more options than ever when it comes to where and how they want to spend their “golden” years. To ensure a quality lifestyle as the years progress, it’s important to eat healthy, stay active, get recommended health screenings, quit smoking, and control stress. It also helps to prepare for future health issues that may coincide with aging, reports Harvard Medical School in its special health report “A Plan for Successful Aging.”

Here are 6 tips Harvard Medical School offers in its report:

  1. Adapt your home. Stairs, baths, and kitchens can present hazards for older people. Even if you don’t need to make changes now, do an annual safety review so you can make necessary updates if your needs change.
  2. Prevent falls. Falls are a big deal for older people – they often result in fractures that can lead to disability, further health problems, or even death. Safety precautions are important, but so are exercises that can improve balance and strength.
  3. Consider your housing options. You might consider investigating naturally occurring retirement communities (NORCs). These neighborhoods and housing complexes aren’t developed specifically to serve seniors – and, in fact, tend to host a mix of ages – but because they have plenty of coordinated care and support available, they are senior-friendly.
  4. Think ahead about how to get the help you may need. Meal preparation, transportation, home repair, housecleaning, and help with financial tasks such as paying bills might be hired out if you can afford it, or shared among friends and family. Elder services offered in your community might be another option.
  5. Plan for emergencies. Who would you call in an emergency? Is there someone who can check in on you regularly? What would you do if you fell and couldn’t reach the phone? Keep emergency numbers near each phone or on speed dial. Carry a cellphone (preferably with large buttons and a bright screen), or consider investing in some type of personal alarm system.
  6. Write advance care directives. Advance care directives, such as a living will, durable power of attorney for health care, or health care proxy, allow you to explain the type of medical care you want if you’re too sick, confused, or injured to voice your wishes. Every adult should have these documents.