Long-Term Care Users Rely on Home Health Care

Aging in Place, Referring to Home Health
About 4.7 million paid long-term care users received home health care in 2011, a number that is drastically increasing due to the growth in the senior population.

About 4.7 million paid long-term care users received home health care in 2011, a number that is drastically increasing due to the growth in the senior population.

Americans receiving paid long-term care are most likely utilizing the services of home health care, according to a report on senior care services and users that was conducted by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s National Center for Health Statistics.

The nation’s 12,200 home health agencies served about 4.7 million patients in 2011, which is more than half of the 8.4 million Americans who receive paid long-term care.

The report collected data from about 58,500 paid, regulated long-term care services providers in 2012 split into five categories—nursing homes, assisted living communities, home health agencies, hospice agencies, and adult day services centers—and includes information on provider capacity, staffing level, and services provided, along with a national profile of long-term care users.

More than 8 million Americans received services from 4,800 adult day services centers, 12,200 home health agencies, 3,700 hospices, 15,700 nursing homes, and 22,200 assisted living and residential care communities. Of those, home health agencies served the largest population, followed by nursing homes with nearly 1.4 million residents and the more than 1.2 million patients who received hospice services.

The number of people using nursing homes, assisted living, or home care services is projected to increase from 15 million in 2000 to 27 million in 2050, according to the CDC. Most of the increase is attributed to a projected growth in the senior population and corresponding need for care services.

Read full report.